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How many different types of Social Security disability benefits are there?

There are at least five major types of Social Security disability benefits.

Disability Insurance Benefits (DIB) is the most important type of Social Security disability benefits. It goes to individuals who have worked in recent years (five out of the last 10 years in most cases) and are now disabled.

Disabled Widow's and Widower's Benefits (DWB) are paid to individuals who are at least 50 and become disabled within a certain amount of time after the death of their husband or wife. The late husband or wife must have worked enough under Social Security to be insured.

Disabled Adult Child benefits (DAC) go to the children of persons who are deceased or who are drawing Social Security disability or retirement benefits. The child must have become disabled before age 22.

(For Disability Insurance Benefits, Disabled Widow's or Widower's Benefits and Disabled Adult Child benefits (DAC), it does not matter whether the disabled individual is rich or poor. Benefits are paid based upon a Social Security earnings record.) 

Supplemental Security Income benefits (SSI), are paid to individuals who are struggle financially and who are disabled. It does not matter for SSI whether an individual has worked in the past or not. SSI child's disability benefits are a variety of SSI benefits paid to children under the age of 18 who are disabled. The way in which disability is determined is a bit different for children.

Child's Disability Benefits (CDB) are paid to children under the age of 17. CDB is another form of SSI, however, the Social Security Administration takes into consideration different factors when considering a child's claim versus an adult's claim. Children who may qualify for CDB are those that have severe or limiting physical and mental conditions. Additionally, there are also limitations with regard household incomes. Those households that exceed a certain amount are excluded from consideration.

Keller & Keller operates as a limited liability entity with offices throughout three states. Keller & Keller's Indiana office operates as an LLP (Keller & Keller LLP). Keller & Keller's Michigan office operates as a PLLC (Keller & Keller PLLC). Keller & Keller's New Mexico office operates as an LLC (Keller & Keller LLC).

The testimonials/stories on this website are of former clients and/or their families. All testimonials/stories are provided for informational purposes only and are not to be considered as a promise or guarantee as to the outcome of your specific case. Each case contains different facts and circumstances. The facts and circumstances of your case will likely differ from the facts of the cases listed.